Research: Perceptions of MS

R
de Seze J et al. Patient perceptions of multiple sclerosis and its treatment. Patient Prefer Adherence. 2012;6:263-73.



BACKGROUND: In order to improve the treatment outcome in MS, it is important to document the factors that influence adherence to therapy. The purpose of this study was to determine patient perceptions and awareness of MS and its treatment, treatment adherence, and impact on quality of life and daily living.

METHODS: This was a cross-sectional observational study performed in France. Each participating neurologist included the first three MSers with RRMS who consulted after the start of the study. Data on clinical features were collected from a physician questionnaire and on disease and treatment perception and on quality of life from a autoquestionnaire.

RESULTS: A total of 175 neurologists entered 202 MSers in the study. The mean duration of disease was 8.0 ± 7.0 years, and immunomodulatory treatment had been administered for a mean duration of 3.0 ± 2.0 years. A total of 166 MSers (82.2%) were treated with interferon-β preparations and 36 MSers (17.8%) with glatiramer acetate. Eighty-five MSers (42.1%) reported missing their injections from time to time and 36 patients (17.8%) reported “drug holidays”. The most frequently given reason for nonadherence was forgetfulness (38.7% of cases). Eighty-six MSers (42.6%) and 70 MSers (34.7%) claimed to be well informed about their disease and treatment, respectively. Adherence was significantly higher in well informed MSers (P = 0.035). The majority of MSers (176, 87.1%) intended continuing their current treatment and 49.5% considered that their current treatment might reduce relapses. The most frequently reported side effect was muscle pain (124, 61.4%).

CONCLUSION: MSer understanding of treatment for disease enhances treatment adherence. Greater MSer involvement in disease management requires better communication between physicians and their patients.

“Is this obvious or not?”

About the author

Prof G

Professor of Neurology, Barts & The London. MS & Preventive Neurology thinker, blogger, runner, vegetable gardener, husband, father, cook and wine & food lover.

1 comment

  • Anon said
    "Pass the book"

    removed by mistake..but a little too cryptic even for me to comment

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