Cranberry extracts no good for bladder infections

C
Gallien P, Amarenco G, Benoit N, Bonniaud V, Donzé C, Kerdraon J, de Seze M, Denys P, Renault A, Naudet F, Reymann JM. Cranberry versus placebo in the prevention of urinary infections in multiple sclerosis: a multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial. Mult Scler. 2014 Jan 8. [Epub ahead of print]


OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to assess the usefulness of cranberry extract in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients suffering from urinary disorders.
METHODS: In total, 171 adult MS outpatients with urinary disorders presenting at eight centers were randomized (stratification according to centre and use of clean intermittent self-catheterization) to cranberry versus placebo in a 1-year, prospective, double-blind study that was analyzed using a sequential method on an intent-to-treat basis. An independent monitoring board analyzed the results of the analyses each time 40 patients were assessed on the main endpoint. Cranberry extract (36 mg proanthocyanidins per day) or a matching placebo was taken by participants twice daily for 1 year. The primary endpoint was the time to first symptomatic urinary tract infection (UTI), subject to validation by a validation committee.
RESULTS: The second sequential analyses allowed us to accept the null hypothesis (no difference between cranberry and placebo). There was no difference in time to first symptomatic UTI distribution across 1 year, with an estimated hazard ratio of 0.99, 95% CI [0.61, 1.60] (p = 0.97). Secondary endpoints and tolerance did not differ between groups.
CONCLUSION: Taking cranberry extract versus placebo twice a day did not prevent UTI occurrence in MS patients with urinary disorders.
So cranberry extract is no good for bladder infections, however there are alternate views suggesting some action

Hess MJ, Hess PE, Sullivan MR, Nee M, Yalla SV. Evaluation of cranberry tablets for the prevention of urinary tract infections in spinal cord injured patients with neurogenic bladder. Spinal Cord. 2008;46(9):622-6. doi: 10.1038/sc.2008.25


STUDY DESIGN: Randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial with a crossover design.
OBJECTIVE:To evaluate cranberry tablets for the prevention of urinary tract infection (UTI) in spinal cord injured (SCI) patients.
METHODS: Subjects with spinal cord injury and documentation of neurogenic bladder were randomized to receive 6 months of cranberry extract tablet or placebo, followed by the alternate preparation for an additional 6 months. The primary outcome was the incidence of UTI.
RESULTS: Forty-seven subjects completed the trial. We found a reduction in the likelihood of UTI and symptoms for any month while receiving the cranberry tablet (P<0.05 for all). During the cranberry period, 6 subjects had 7 UTI, compared with 16 subjects and 21 UTI in the placebo period (P<0.05 for both number of subjects and incidence). The frequency of UTI was reduced to 0.3 UTI per year vs 1.0 UTI per year while receiving placebo. Subjects with a glomerular filtration rate (GFR) greater than 75 ml min(-1) received the most benefit.
CONCLUSION: Cranberry extract tablets should be considered for the prevention of UTI in SCI patients with neurogenic bladder. Patients with a high GFR may receive the most benefit.
This latter study is very small and the reliability perhaps will be not be in the same as the study examining ten times the number. What is your experience?

 

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MouseDoctor

2 comments

  • cranberry active ingredient is d-mannose sugar. They should do study on d-mannose in ms'ers. There will be bigger chance for success (it's proven to work on non ms'ers).

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