ArchiveDecember 2018

#ThinkHand – taking telerehabilitation one step further

What does 2019 hold for the various Barts-MS campaigns?  We are continuing to make the case for our #ThinkHand campaign with several outputs in 2018, which are being used to support our work in this area. I am very proud that ORATORIO-HAND, a phase-3b study of ocrelizumab in PPMS, which will include patients with an EDSS of up to 8.0 and will start recruiting in the first quarter of 2019...

Swimming inhibits autoimmunity

Is swimming beneficial in MS? As part of our remit the UK government wants us to discuss animal experiments, and as this is a blog about good and bad research news, we will defend animal experimentation when it is useful. However, I think we need to be bold and say “Not in my name” when it is not.  Yes this goes against the norm on science reporting where “every thing is...

A new old technology

There is nothing more exciting than a new, but old, technology!   A problem we face when making the case for a list of essential medications to treat MS in resource-poor settings is the issue of MS misdiagnosis and the inability to monitor MS disease activity using MRI in these settings. MRI is an expensive innovation and a large number of countries simply don’t have enough MR scanners to...

Why do I have MS?.. Because you have a common virus?

Deeba E, Koptides D, Gaglia E, Constantinou A, Lambrianides A, Pantzaris M, Krashias G, Christodoulou C. Evaluation of Epstein-Barr virus-specific antibodies in Cypriot multiple sclerosis patients. Mol Immunol. 2018;105:270-275 Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, demyelinating, inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS) with a strong autoimmune component. Several genetic and...

All I want for Christmas is a cure

How do we know if someone is cured of having MS? This is a very difficult question that I keep getting asked. How will we know if we have cured MS? Based on what I have said in my recent post ‘Explaining why you get worse despite being NEDA‘ you may be cured of our MS, but still, have progressive disease. The difference between progressive disease, which is due to previous MS damage...

Measuring astrocyte function for a blood test

Högel H, Rissanen E, Barro C, Matilainen M, Nylund M, Kuhle J, Airas L.Serum glial fibrillary acidic protein correlates with multiple sclerosis disease severity. Mult Scler. 2018 Dec 20:1352458518819380. BACKGROUND:Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of two soluble biomarkers, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and neurofilament light chain (NfL), have been shown to associate with multiple...

More women develop MS than men, why?

Yes, I agree the cause of MS has to explain the changing sex ratio of the disease.  To prove that MS is caused by a single factor or the interaction of several factors, it has to explain everything we know about the epidemiology of the disease. In terms of EBV being the cause of MS, how does EBV explain why RRMS is becoming more common in women? In comparison, the incidence of PPMS seems to...

Will 2019 be the year of sequential therapies?

We need to rethink how we want to tackle MS in 2019. Do we need a true induction approach; i.e. sequential therapies? Or will a simple combination therapy approach suffice? In 2018 I continued to ask the MS community to ditch the term induction therapy (see ECTRIMS2018 slideshow, and Current Opinion review, below). The term ‘induction’ is not a very useful term when describing the mode of action...

What have poppies and fields got to do with the cause of MS?

It took a while for me to truly understand why the poppy is so important to people living in the UK. The poppy is a symbol of remembrance, i.e. to observe and never forget.  Why are fields and poppies relevant to MS?  The study below supports anecdotal clinical evidence of many of my clinical mentors and, now as I have gotten older, my own clinical experience; if you have an MS relapse...

Translate

Categories

Recent Posts

Recent Comments

Archives