Half a brain..watch the movie

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Three-dimensional surface models of autopsied human brains constructed from multiple photographs by photogrammetry. Shintaku H, Yamaguchi M, Toru S, Kitagawa M, Hirokawa K, Yokota T, Uchihara T. PLoS One. 2019; 14 :e0219619. 

Virtual three-dimensional (3D) surface models of autopsied human brain hemispheres were constructed by integrating multiple two-dimensional (2D) photographs. To avoid gravity-dependent deformity, formalin-fixed hemispheres were placed on non-refractile, transparent acrylic plates, which allowed us to take 2D photographs from various different angles. Photogrammetric calculations using software (ReCap Pro cloud service, Autodesk, San Rafael, CA, USA) allowed us calculate the 3D surface of each brain hemisphere. Virtual brain models could be moved and rotated freely to allow smooth, seamless views from different angles and different magnifications. When viewing rotating 3D models on 2D screens, 3D aspects of the models were enhanced using motion parallax. Comparison of different brains using this method allowed us to identify disease-specific patterns of macroscopic atrophy, that were not apparent in conventional 2D photographs. For example, we observed frontal lobe atrophy in a progressive supranuclear palsy brain, and even more subtle atrophy in the superior temporal gyrus in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Thus, our method facilities recognition of gyral atrophy. In addition, it provides a much more powerful and suitable way of visualizing the overall appearance of the brain as a three-dimensional structure. Comparison of normal and diseased brains will allow us to associate different macroscopic changes in the brain to clinical manifestations of various diseases.

If you want to see a 3D brain have a look at the movies

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MouseDoctor

4 comments

  • Nother 3 d study of single ms lesions

    Great stuff

    3-D brain imaging may improve treatment path for MS patients

    https://medicalxpress.com/news/2019-07-d-brain-imaging-treatment-path.html

    “We’re studying how the three-dimensional structure and surface characteristics of lesions impact the surrounding brain tissue,” Okuda said. “Our findings are significant because they provide clarity on lesion age and the potential for myelin repair, which are not readily apparent with current MRI techniques. This new technique may serve as an ideal platform for the study of myelin repair treatments in the near future.”

    In the current study, researchers used 3 Tesla MRI to classify a lesion and its periphery in terms of several measurements. The results indicate that approximately one-third of MS lesions show signs of a high probability of repair

    “If a lesion does not have the capacity to heal, remyelinating drugs aren’t going to help,” Sivakolundu said. “Our technique becomes a biomarker for targeted therapy because we can now decide if a lesion is likely to heal. From that, we can decide which drug regimen is worthwhile.”

    “If a lesion does not have the capacity to heal, remyelinating drugs aren’t going to help,” Sivakolundu said. “Our technique becomes a biomarker for targeted therapy because we can now decide if a lesion is likely to heal. From that, we can decide which drug regimen is worthwhile.”

    “Lesions that have the capacity to heal are more spherical in shape, with fewer jagged boundaries,” he said. “They also have rougher surfaces, as opposed to smooth, because roughness indicates high metabolism in the surrounding cells.”

    The current drugs are designed to prevent a relapse, which is more likely in newer lesions,” he said. “So patients with newer injuries might require more intense immunosuppressive therapy than those with less active lesions.”

    “We’re helping doctors evaluate one therapeutic course against another,” he said. “Either a patient’s lesions can be healed, and they should choose the path of remyelination therapy, or they should choose the current therapy and focus on damage limitation.”

    Not quite Barts blog aproach

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