Is too much Vitamin D Bad for you? Part II. If you are a Rodent Apparently Yes

I

High dose vitamin D exacerbates central nervous system autoimmunity by raising T-cell excitatory calcium. Häusler D, Torke S, Peelen E, Bertsch T, Djukic M, Nau R, Larochelle C, Zamvil SS, Brück W, Weber MS. Brain. 2019 Jul 13. pii: awz190.

We have had a discussion on the merits of Vitamin D and making models of MS worse. We have said that the vitamin D council suggests that too much vitamin D should be avoided.

MD2 has chipped in with this point

“The reason vitamin D is used as a mice and rat poison is because they are sensitive to it. It kills by inducing Hypercalcemia.”

Breaking News! d-CON® Rodenticide Ingredient Changes to Vitamin D3 | Pet Poison Helpline

So it seems maybe in this EAE study they may have been poisoning their mice. Is this why disease got worse?

The lethal single dose for a mouse is about 40mg/kg (1mg a mouse) for a duck its 2000mg/kg showing the sensitivity to the rodents.

In bait the concentration is 0.075%. In the experiment it was 75000IU/kg in the diet so about 2mg/kg and a mouse eats about 3g a day (0.05mg of vitamin D), so a twentyith of a known lethal dose given every day for 2 months. Some people say up to 5g is eaten a day so closer towards a tenth of a lethal dose a day. The) so the dose given is not instantly lethal but if you are sick, it could tip the balance, we don’t know if there were any deaths in the experiment for example. This was not reported.

Moral of the story Read, Read Read

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MouseDoctor

4 comments

  • “So it seems maybe in this EAE study they may have been poisoning their mice. Is this why disease got worse?”…..

    Does the Pope shit in the woods?…or is that a bear?….

    Either way…..Very likely.

  • Other than what your post says, I think EAE as an MS model is only useful for symptomatic treatments in the first place. Vitamin D is potentially treating an underlying cause.

    Vitamin D not only influences T cells, but also seem to have antiviral properties. Vitamin D receptors also play a role in EBV and other infections. EBNA3 blocks the activation of VDR for example. With so many things poting to EBV (and sometimes other infections) I wouldn’t be so quick to dismiss a potential connection.

    I wouldn’t be surprised if vitamin D deficiency in combination with various pathogens and a certain genetic predisposition sets MS in motion.

    And also lets not forget: The potential (life-threatening) side effects of vitamin D supplementation, even in high doses, are usually less harmful and much easier to manage than those of DMDs. The only relevant question here is, if vitamin D changes the outcome or not.

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