Inflammation in the brain is a bad thing.

I

This study says that inflammatory events in the CNS are important for progression, I say NSS!

Enhanced B cell products in the CSF of MS

Intrathecal, Not Systemic Inflammation Is Correlated With Multiple Sclerosis Severity, Especially in Progressive Multiple Sclerosis. Milstein JL, Barbour CR, Jackson K, Kosa P, Bielekova B. Front Neurol. 2019 Nov 22;10:1232. doi: 10.3389/fneur.2019.01232. eCollection 2019

Objective: To test the hypothesis that Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients have increased peripheral inflammation compared to healthy donors and that this systemic activation of the immune system, reflected by acute phase reactants (APRs) measured in the blood, contributes to intrathecal inflammation, which in turn contributes to the development of disability in MS. Methods: Eight serum APRs measured in a prospectively-collected cross-sectional cohort with a total of 51 healthy donors and 291 untreated MS patients were standardized and assembled into related biomarker clusters to derive global measures of systemic inflammation. The resulting APR clusters were compared between diagnostic categories and correlated to equivalently-derived cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of innate and adaptive immunity. Finally, correlations were calculated between biomarkers of systemic and intrathecal inflammation and MS severity measures, which predict future rates of disability progression. Results: While two blood APR clusters were elevated in MS patients, only one exhibited a weak correlation with MS severity. All CSF inflammation clusters, except CSF albumin, correlated with at least one measure of MS severity, with biomarkers of humoral adaptive immunity exhibiting the strongest correlations, especially in Progressive MS. Conclusion: Systemic inflammation does not appear to be strongly associated with intrathecal inflammation in MS. Positive correlations between markers of intrathecal inflammation, especially of humoral immunity, with MS severity measures support a pathogenic role of intrathecal (compartmentalized) inflammation in central nervous system tissue destruction, including in Progressive MS.

About the author

MouseDoctor

6 comments

  • “Systemic inflammation does not appear to be strongly associated with intrathecal inflammation in MS”

    Why them Alemtuzumab is so efficacious?

    Alemtuzumab kills most of te Systemic inflammation but does not enter cns

    Obrigado

    • because when it is used early there is more limited persistent CNS inflammation when it is used late when there is persistent neurodegenerative inflammation, clinical signs continue to worsen (Coles et al. 1999).

      Obviously the system inflammation feeds into generating the persistent CNS

      de nada

      • 🙂

        Caneco

        Finalmente

        Been asking this for so long

        Ok but you know (better than me) that timing that early cns inflamatory events its very dificult

        Also some people present with more cns inflamation than others (damage cell in the cns)

        And some years ago i came to see Dr David Baker video saying that ms its neurodegenerative from the get go

        Maybe thats only part of the story

        Thanks again

        • “Systemic inflammation does not appear to be strongly associated with intrathecal inflammation in MS”

          I didnt say this, I said no shit sherlock

          Yes Ms is neurodegeneratative from the get do and it is inflammatory from the get go until the end, system inflammation is part of the story as is CNS inflammation

  • “Systemic inflammation does not appear to be strongly associated with intrathecal inflammation in MS”

    I didnt say this, I said no shit sherlock

    Yes Ms is neurodegeneratative from the get do and it is inflammatory from the get go until the end, system inflammation is part of the story as is CNS inflammation

By MouseDoctor

Translate

Categories

Recent Posts

Recent Comments

Archives