#MSCOVID19 ProfG proved right. Virus found in the CNS

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ABN document on MS guidelines saying that SAR-Cov2 is not neurotropic. However ProfG questioned this. Here is an example of virus detected in the cerebrospinal fluid

A first Case of Meningitis/Encephalitis associated with SARS-Coronavirus-2. Moriguchi T, Harii N, Goto J, Harada D, Sugawara H, Takamino J, Ueno M, Sakata H, Kondo K, Myose N, Nakao A, Takeda M, Haro H, Inoue O, Suzuki-Inoue K, Kubokawa K, Ogihara S, Sasaki T, Kinouchi H, Kojin H, Ito M, Onishi H, Shimizu T, Sasaki Y, Enomoto N, Ishihara H, Furuya S, Yamamoto T, Shimada S.Int J Infect Dis. 2020 Apr 3. pii: S1201-9712(20)30195-8.

Novel coronavirus (SARS-Coronavirus-2:SARS-CoV-2) which emerged in Wuhan, China, has spread to multiple countries rapidly. We report the first case of meningitis associated with SARS-CoV-2 who was brought in by ambulance due to a convulsion accompanied by unconsciousness. He had never been to any foreign countries. He felt generalized fatigue and fever (day 1). He saw doctors nearby twice (day2 and 5) and was prescribed Laninamivir and antipyretic agents, His family visited his home and found that he was unconsciousness and lying on the floor in his vomit. He was immediately transported to this hospital by ambulance (day 9). Under emergency transport, he had transient generalized seizures that lasted about a minute. He had obvious neck stiffness. The specific SARS-CoV-2 RNA was not detected in the nasopharyngeal swab but was detected in a CSF. Anti- HSV 1 and varicella-zoster IgM antibodies were not detected in serum samples. A brain MRI showed hyperintensity along the wall of right lateral ventricle and hyperintense signal changes in the right mesial temporal lobe and hippocampus, suggesting the possibility of SARS-CoV-2 meningitis. This case warns the physicians of patients who have CNS symptoms.

NDG has said she has seen a case too, hope I don’t need to go to her hospital…worse Death Rate in UK:-(

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    • It really doesn’t bear thinking about. In 18 months either everyone will have caught it and recovered or not.

        • To all the herd immunity fans:

          1) Spanish flu wiped out 1% of the population in 2 years (1918/1920) – why did herd immunity not work at the time and if it did, why do we think we will not loose as many this time around ?

          2) I ask again, why are you so confident that this one will not mutate and take us back to square 1 ? (no viable answers to this question so far)

          Good luck with those 2 questions….

          • 1) Spanish flu targeted a very different demographic, I doubt 80% were asymptomatic and importantly the herd were unaware with a gagged media, no supply of anti-biotics, ventilators, no cars, no online shopping etc etc etc and no TV or radio…so they couldn’t listen to Government advice and they had been in a World Word War for 3 years and people were not afraid of running at machine guns, add fridges and freezers, online banking etc, etc,etc

            2) Or course it will mutate that is what viruses do, it has already mutated e.g the S and the L isoforms, but the mutation rate of key proteins has not been fast. If you want to read the internet there are plenty of studies on sequencing the virus, numerous times in numerous countries

            You dont need luck…you can simply read:-)

          • Interesting so now you need a test to see if you neutralise response to virus. Can you get COVID19 twice? The tests have their issues

  • 10 misconceptions about the 1918 flu, the ‘greatest pandemic in history’

    The pandemic was the work of a ‘super-virus’

    The 1918 flu spread rapidly, killing 25 million people in just the first six months. This led some to fear the end of mankind, and has long fueled the supposition that the strain of influenza was particularly lethal.

    However, more recent study suggests that the virus itself, though more lethal than other strains, was not fundamentally different from those that caused epidemics in other years.

    Much of the high death rate can be attributed to crowding in military camps and urban environments, as well as poor nutrition and sanitation, which suffered during wartime. It’s now thought that many of the deaths were due to the development of bacterial pneumonias in lungs weakened by influenza.

    The pandemic was the work of a ‘super-virus’

    The 1918 flu spread rapidly, killing 25 million people in just the first six months. This led some to fear the end of mankind, and has long fueled the supposition that the strain of influenza was particularly lethal.

    However, more recent study suggests that the virus itself, though more lethal than other strains, was not fundamentally different from those that caused epidemics in other years.

    Much of the high death rate can be attributed to crowding in military camps and urban environments, as well as poor nutrition and sanitation, which suffered during wartime. It’s now thought that many of the deaths were due to the development of bacterial pneumonias in lungs weakened by influenza.

    4. The virus killed most people who were infected with it

    In fact, the vast majority of the people who contracted the 1918 flu survived. National death rates among the infected generally did not exceed 20%.

    However, death rates varied among different groups. In the U.S., deaths were particularly high among Native American populations, perhaps due to lower rates of exposure to past strains of influenza. In some cases, entire Native communities were wiped out.

    Of course, even a 20% death rate vastly exceeds a typical flu, which kills less than 1% of those infected

    8. Widespread immunization ended the pandemic

    Immunization against the flu was not practiced in 1918, and thus played no role in ending the pandemic.

    Exposure to prior strains of the flu may have offered some protection. For example, soldiers who had served in the military for years suffered lower rates of death than new recruits.

    In addition, the rapidly mutating virus likely evolved over time into less lethal strains. This is predicted by models of natural selection. Because highly lethal strains kill their host rapidly, they cannot spread as easily as less lethal strains.

    https://medicalxpress.com/news/2020-03-misconceptions-flu-greatest-pandemic-history.html

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