COVID Breakfast

C

As you know COVID breakfast is a light hearted look at the lunacy that is affecting us all.

I made a little Joke about the spate of microbiome studies that have sprung up since COVID-19 arrived….However, this seems more logical than Dr Spock on Star Trek compared to the one that DrM&M told me about. The registered trial that I am frightened to talk about, is this one…NCT04361838. Would it be religious intolerance if I said anything negative?

Damned if you do damned if your don’t

This is a multicenter; double blind randomized controlled study investigating the role of remote intercessory multi-denominational prayer on clinical outcomes in COVID-19 + patients in the intensive care unit.

Really, I mean really…what do I think?…Best not say

When it works it is time to “throw in the towel, as science has failed.

This weekend I have been on my first major post-COVID MS conference 2020. The European Neurology Association. This could make International Meetings much more streamlined. This is a four day meeting and whilst some companies are showing their stuff in real time, most of the talks and posters are pre loaded.

Therefore I did my “Le Louve approach” to conferences and saw every thing in a relatively short time. Enlightened yes and relieved because I didn’t have to spend 4 days away.

OK what is the Le Louvre Approach?

OK you may call me a philistein, but I like what I like. What I don’t like I won’t waste my time bothering with it. One time I rushed through Le Louvre and saw all the paintings relatively quickly. I walked real fast. In my eye most of the painting were not that great, it’s a taste thing, and not worth spending anytime looking at. Occasionally I saw one I liked and stopped for enough time to look at it. There were only a handfully I really liked.

This was quick, but it was quicker the first time I went…I simply went to the gift shop and looked through the post card collection:-)…OK it was closing in 30minutes but I got to see all the best pictures

So I went to the EAN meeting and you have 10-30minute presentations and the slides are there. You can listen to each talk for 10-30minutes of your life and then go to the next one without wasting 5 minutes walk between the rooms to find out that session you left was so far behind that you have missed the talk you wanted to listen to.

Alternatively you could start the talk, stop it and then whizz through the slides one by one and stop and listen to anything that seems interesting but most were self explanatory so you dont need to stop. So a 30minute talk done in less than 5 minutes many in a minute. In an hour of so, most of the the MS talks at the meeting and the poster session, meaning 3 days of my life liberated, whilst still being educated and no slides hidden by being shown for a nano second…Is this the way forward?

What next a hologram of Prof G?

Do you see the Most beautiful women in the world? A flying fat chick with an apple or something that makes you smile?…That is the power of Juanita Fortuna

About the author

MouseDoctor

35 comments

    • Today I am having a day off it is a bank holiday and am going in the garden, Hedge needs cutting and maybe even venture to a Garden Centre…and then out for a walk or a bike ride. I finished work at 4am after an 8.30 am start….So Altzhemers here I come

  • Don’t forget that some doctors (not those associated with this blog) need three day conferences to get sufficient CPD to revalidate. Losing the opportunity to ask presenters challenging questions undermines the validity of the process. The loss of the challenge of having to field these questions, makes the presentation process far less demanding. Some researchers, dwelling in dimly lit laboratories and rarely venturing out into the light, need the exotic conference venues to restore their vitamin D levels.

    • Then you can do back when the presentation is presented I am guessing with live feedback some of the rooms had live presentations the Italian neurologist with 8 really sick patients and only enough kit to attempt survival on 4 was something I stopped to listen to. However you could go to a meeting and sit drinking coffee with your mates and still get the CPD points?

      • Some will undoubtedly sit and drink coffee with friends, probably discussing the conference program. With a virtual conference they might go out and leave a computer playing to itself. The only way to get around this would be to include a test of the material covered at the end of a learning opportunity like the medscape seminars. I admit that I’ve multitasked during Local Medical Committee online seminars until something catches my attention. I once worked with somebody who’s mantra was, “repetition is the key to learning” and recorded presentations permit this.

    • Yes most of our conferences are in sodding exotic London. I hear ECTRIMS has gone virtual, I bet the science one I usually attend is cancelled

      • Hi Doctor,

        Not quite, I’m kind of curious.

        The time I realized the feat of hurtling down the stairs of a museum in 10 minutes was at San Francisco Guggenheim museum: I was only interested in the work of the French Nobel Prize winner Charpak, a description of which is available in French: https://www.oeuvresouvertes.net/spip.php?article1760 , but here is a translation link: https://www.translatetheweb.com/?ref=TVert&from=&to=en&a=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.oeuvresouvertes.net%2Fspip.php%3Farticle1760

        <>

        Sorry, I am a bit out of scope …
        Except if you can establish a link between electromagnetic fields and DNA elaboration, as tried by Nobel prize winner Pr Luc Montagnier. This is a puzzling question, not answered yet!

        Best regards!

        • Text between quotes:

          Some may have noticed that all recording techniques use the shape of the spiral (even in the coil of the speakers), symbolic or useful form. This same spiral has also been regularly printed on pottery since the invention of the tower. Such an analogy and especially the path of the spiral, trace – recording – of the movement of pottery making, inspired Georges Charpak when he hoped to revive ancient sounds, in 1992. Using a laser, probably different from that used to read information on the surface of the compact discs, Charpak planned to “read” the imprint of sounds that would have surrounded the potter in his workshop and which by the play of vibrations would thus be inscribed in the spiral that the tower helped to engrave. This very serious proposal is the result of theoretical reflection, as well as a profound reverie; the accession to the past and its lot of secrets, emotions, by a means beyond the rambling of the fable. But this idea was not new, it extended the experiments conducted in 1969 by Richard Woodbridge. With it seems to be born this discipline called “archaeoacoustic” [1] , consisting of the recovery of sound phenomena engraved in objects. Woodbridge conducted its experiment in four parts. The first provides a base for Charpak’s assumptions: “He could recover the noise produced by the potter’s turn from a pottery, using a hand-held piezo-electric cell (Astatic Corp. Model 2) with a wooden tip, connected directly to an arrangement of audio headsets. The second experiment resulted in the 60 Hz snoring of the engine that drove the potter’s wheel. The following experiments are more interesting, involving a canvas that is painted while it is exposed to the sounds of military music produced by loudspeakers. Some of the brushstrokes looked streaky, and “short snippets of music” could be detected. For the fourth experiment, the painter spoke the word “blue” during a brushstroke, and after a long search, one could hear the word again by rubbing the canvas with the tip. (Christer Hamp). Charpak’s problem was indeed to be able to find an ancient pottery with every chance of detecting what Woodbridge had experimented with; in any event the possibility was attested. The lot of fantasies she suggests forbids giving more credit to Charpak’s project than the potentiality induced by Woodbridge. But, in addition to Chladni’s discoveries, they once again solidify the intimate links between sound and image.

  • Good morning, sir,

    I usually like you for your skills, I laughed as well with your dismissal on this conference of last hope, but I will laugh at you when you talk about your rocket ride through the Louvre.

    Because foreigners who do like you make us laugh, when I think of the hundreds of hours I spent in the Louvre, in the MET, in the Prado, all over Italy, to study meticulously the painting techniques, their subjects, their painters (read Vasari …), mythology, Christianity, etc. I am a French lover of art, how many subtleties do you ignore? The greatest artists like Veronese and Montegna are in the Louvre, not you. There must be a reason.

    I love the USA but I know how recent your history is and how you neglect culture. Americans are geniuses of commerce and science, but don’t talk about the Louvre, for us it’s as sacred as the Parthenon and the Vatican, if you manage to place them on the map (!) Ho ho ho ho ho ho !

    Friendly yours.

    • You sound like a Luvvie:-). I like Art if fact I have some nice pieces and going to a conference made me want to purchase some, but I like what I like….Some people can look at a bowl of Fruit and wax lyrical about the meaning of position of the banana, I can’t. MD2 was there on the walk two and from the Congress in Stiges

      • I always thought the sun flower was done by a 5 year old. Until a friend of mine insisted I go and see the painting in person at exhibition in London. I came back said yeah its rubbish he just stuck flower on a flat canvas. My friend told me it was a flat painting. The penny dropped. For a moment I had propelled to a new level of existence. Beyond space and time. After 4 pints and dose of eastenders was back to normal.

      • Hi Doctor,

        Not quite, I’m kind of curious.

        The time I realized the feat of hurtling down the stairs of a museum in 10 minutes was at San Francisco Guggenheim museum: I was only interested in the work of the French Nobel Prize winner Charpak, a description of which is available in French: https://www.oeuvresouvertes.net/spip.php?article1760 , but here is a translation link: https://www.translatetheweb.com/?ref=TVert&from=&to=en&a=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.oeuvresouvertes.net%2Fspip.php%3Farticle1760

        “Some may have noticed that all recording techniques use the shape of the spiral (even in the coil of the speakers), symbolic or useful form. This same spiral has also been regularly printed on pottery since the invention of the tower. Such an analogy and especially the path of the spiral, trace – recording – of the movement of pottery making, inspired Georges Charpak when he hoped to revive ancient sounds, in 1992. Using a laser, probably different from that used to read information on the surface of the compact discs, Charpak planned to “read” the imprint of sounds that would have surrounded the potter in his workshop and which by the play of vibrations would thus be inscribed in the spiral that the tower helped to engrave. This very serious proposal is the result of theoretical reflection, as well as a profound reverie; the accession to the past and its lot of secrets, emotions, by a means beyond the rambling of the fable. But this idea was not new, it extended the experiments conducted in 1969 by Richard Woodbridge. With it seems to be born this discipline called “archaeoacoustic” [1] , consisting of the recovery of sound phenomena engraved in objects. Woodbridge conducted its experiment in four parts. The first provides a base for Charpak’s assumptions: “He could recover the noise produced by the potter’s turn from a pottery, using a hand-held piezo-electric cell (Astatic Corp. Model 2) with a wooden tip, connected directly to an arrangement of audio headsets. The second experiment resulted in the 60 Hz snoring of the engine that drove the potter’s wheel. The following experiments are more interesting, involving a canvas that is painted while it is exposed to the sounds of military music produced by loudspeakers. Some of the brushstrokes looked streaky, and “short snippets of music” could be detected. For the fourth experiment, the painter spoke the word “blue” during a brushstroke, and after a long search, one could hear the word again by rubbing the canvas with the tip. (Christer Hamp). Charpak’s problem was indeed to be able to find an ancient pottery with every chance of detecting what Woodbridge had experimented with; in any event the possibility was attested. The lot of fantasies she suggests forbids giving more credit to Charpak’s project than the potentiality induced by Woodbridge. But, in addition to Chladni’s discoveries, they once again solidify the intimate links between sound and image.”

        Sorry, I am a bit out of scope …
        Except if you can establish a link between electromagnetic fields and DNA elaboration, as tried by Nobel prize winner Pr Luc Montagnier. This is a puzzling question, not answered yet!

        Best regards!

  • Hi Dr Mouse,

    You’re English, not American, sorry I can believe that. But you reasoned the same way.

    I love the one who was once called the perfidious Albion, but whose Elizabethan greatness I admire, and I adore, above all, your Queen.

    Your remark is not one of those who practice the Tate Gallery, the Courtauld Collection, the National Gallery, the British Museum, taking endless and respectful pauses to admire the talents of the past.

    But I would be more inclined to laugh with you at some of the European institutions dragging their feet on essential projects. I understand that you are leaving “economic” and political Europe, to try to build better with your resources. There is too much administrative sclerosis here! Multiple sclerosis!

    I hope that the studies will make it possible to discover the origins of the disease, which I share with many readers, and to cure it.

    Doctor, gee! Kill EBV and missed her hide!
    Such a pun is unforgivable.

    Kind regards.

    • First date with Mrs Mouse (An American)…first gallery in thee British Museum and there for an hour….reading every sodding lable..it was the section on pots when we know the best bit is the Eygtian Mummies. Last time she too me to an art exhibition was Ellsworth Kelly at Tate Britain…finished in 30 seconds…..what a pile of painting square and differnet shaped canvases with a solid colour..I call that….decorating. I can do that! Speaking of which I will do that as I had a leak in the bathroom and we all know which was water falls…a prayer didn’t work then:-0

      • Hi,

        I don’t want to talk about Pollock or Malevich in order to remain polite, and so I share this opinion with you that technical tests are not always Art.

        The Art (speaking about paintings) that interests me above all is the Renaissance, classical, impressionist period, but I want to stop at Kandinsky, that is to say that I include Giotto, Piero della Francesca, Michelangelo, da Vinci and dozens of others from the Seicento, then Titian, Canaletto, … Monet, Renoir, van Gogh, Dali, this list is not exhaustive!

        Friendly yours.
        :o))

          • Not yet, but next time I go to Catalonia if we ever allowed to travel again…however have been to St.Peteresburg in Florida.There I was the snail

          • @Luis, visited Dali’s museum in Figueras twice, slept and had dinners at hotel Duran, all fabulous experiences!

          • Hi Luis, and … Pinacoteca di Brera in Milano, very specific (lots of italian painters), Vaticano, La Galleria degli Uffizi (Firenze), Galleria dell’Accademia (Venezia), numerous Heavens, temples of Art!
            …/… :o)))

          • You mean the guy that gave use the Frame? :-)….I meant John Williams the Artist and not the Composer.

  • NCT04361838 is not yet recruiting and we don’t need to talk about it.

    But I took a look at a study ‘A Randomized, Controlled Trial of the Effects of Remote, Intercessory Prayer on Outcomes in Patients Admitted to the Coronary Care Unit’ from 1999. ‘ To see the justification for the study:

    ‘In some societies and among certain religious groups, prayer is believed to be the most important therapy that can be offered to a sick person, superseding even medical intervention.’

  • Le “Louve” experience: perhaps equivalent to that of an artist going through your lab. If you don’t what you’re looking at, it’s not going to mean much.

    • There you go….I’ve obviously hit a nerve with this post. So it was not the breakfast where people laugh but the one where the coco pop got stuck in the wind pipe:-)

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