Barts-MS team

B

The Barts-MS team encompasses many people who have worked with us over the years. Once you’re a part of it, you never really leave (not in a sinister way though). Here are the biographies of the Barts-MS team that contribute to the blog, and below that, a list of the team who do other, equally brilliant things for the team.

Profg

Job title:
Professor of Neurology
Current research interests:
Epstein Barr virus as a possible cause of multiple sclerosis, multiple sclerosis related neurodegeneration, biomarker discovery and immune tolerance strategies.
Public engagement:
Research days, clinic speak initiatives, Digesting Science ambassador programme, @gavingiovannoni
Career history:
I did my undergraduate medical training at the University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa. I graduated cum laude in 1987, winning the prizes for best graduate in medicine and surgery. After completing my neurology specialist training in South Africa I moved to the Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London in 1993.

After three years as a clinical research fellow, under Professor Ed Thompson, and then two years as the Scarfe Lecturer, working for Professor W. Ian McDonald, I was awarded a PhD in immunology from the University of London in 1998.

I was appointed as a Clinical Senior Lecturer, Royal Free and University College Medical School, in 1998.

I moved back to Institute of Neurology, Queen Square in 1999 and was made a Reader in Neuroimmunology in 2004. I spent 13 years of his life working at The National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square, London.

I was appointed to the Chair of Neurology, Blizard Institute, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, in November 2006. In 2008 I took over as the Neuroscience and Trauma Centre Lead in the Blizard Institute.
When I’m not working:
I’m being a thinker, blogger, runner, vegetable gardener, husband, father, cook and wine & food lover.

mousedoc

Job title:
Professor of Neuroimmunology
Current research interests:
I have been investigating the development of experimental treatments for relapsing and progressive MS and in the development of symptom control agents, some of which have been tested in humans and some of which have become treatments for MS.
Public engagement:
Research days, Meet the Scientist, Digesting Science Ambassador, Twitter – @prof_mouse
Career history:
I spent my academic career at different places of the University of London. I was awarded a BSc (Hons) in Zoology from Bedford College in 1983 and was awarded a PhD from London University in Immunology/Pathology in 1987 for work at the Institute of Basic Medical Science on immunological tolerance induction in delayed hypersensitivity of the skin.

I spent the following six years as the Angela Limerick Lecturer, for multiple sclerosis research at the Hunterian Institute, The Royal College of Surgeons of England, working on delayed hypersensitivity in the brain, where I developed an active research interest in multiple sclerosis.

I took a 5 year Principal Fellowship to the Institute of Ophthalmology, University College London in 1994 and became the first Senior Fellow of the Multiple Sclerosis Society. I moved to the Institute of Neurology, University College London in 1999.

I became a senior lecturer in 2003 and got a personal chair in 2004 as Professor of Neuroimmunology. I moved to Queen Mary in the autumn of 2006.

Follow @prof_mouse on twitter.

DrBenJ

Job title:
Junior doctor (academic clinical fellow)
Current research interests:
  • Basic disease mechanisms in MS (mainly the role of B cells)
  • The role of genetics in MS risk
  • Understanding and predicting the response to highly-active disease-modifying therapies
Public engagement:
I blog when I have something to say about a paper, I tweet when I don’t.
Career history:
I got interested in MS in my 5th year at medical school. I started working on the blood-brain barrier with Gabe DeLuca’s lab and found it so interesting that I continued to work with them throughout my degree.

I came to East London to start my clinical training and continue working on MS with ProfG and the team. Since coming here I’ve been involved in the cladribine work and a couple of side projects. I’m getting stuck into some longer-term projects during the next few years while I continue my general medical training and then start to specialise in neurology.

I’m part of the Barts-MS team because:
It’s a dynamic and highly-motivated team dedicated to beating MS.

When I’m not working:
I’m spending time with my partner, my friends and my family; cycling; running; playing football; watching football; or reading about football.

Mouse Doctor 2

Job title:
Research Fellow
Current research interests:
All aspects of MS, particularly neuroprotection and symptom relief
Public engagement:
MS Life, Meet the Scientists; Barts/UCL annual Research Day; Digesting Science Ambassador Programme
Career history:
Autoimmunity of thyroid disease, blood:brain barrier and cell migration in MS, experimental models of various aspects of MS with MD for over 20 years.
Career history:
Autoimmunity of thyroid disease, blood:brain barrier and cell migration in MS, experimental models of various aspects of MS with MD for over 20 years.
I’m part of the Barts-MS team because:
I want to make a difference for pwMS. I think we are

When I’m not working:
I’m a guitar hero!

Alison

Job title:
Lecturer in Public Engagement and Patient Public Involvement
Current research interests:
Improving the patient experience for people with MS through design
Public engagement:
Involving and engaging the public and people with MS in research is a huge part of my work. Examples are Digesting Science (engaging families affected by MS), this blog, the Burning Debates series at ECTRIMS (engaging Neurologists through social media), MS: The Big Knit, Clinic Speak. @somehow_related
Career history:
I met the Barts MS team in 2009 when I was doing my MA in Design Interactions at the Royal College of Art. From then I have worked with them on many different projects to improve the patient experience for people with MS. These take the form of public engagement projects, research studies and service improvement projects. My PhD research looks more specifically at the different versions of patient experience that are currently used by healthcare, science, charities and patients themselves
I’m part of the Barts-MS team because:
They are an incredibly fun and inspiring bunch of people.
When I’m not working:
I’m running or recovering from a running injury!

Mark Baker

Job title:
Lecturer in Neuroscience
Current research interests:
The effects of temperature changes on nervous system function – particularly in the ‘white matter’ that is composed of nerve fibres. Some years ago we found that optic nerve axons (our ‘model’ of white matter) are much more sensitive to changes in temperature than peripheral nerve, and we are working out what the mechanism is. This has a clear tie-up with MS, because MS has famously temperature dependent symptoms, with symptoms getting worse with warming.

ALSO Amyloid b, a truncated and misfolded protein that evidence suggests is key to initiating Alzheimer’s disease. We look at amyloid b ‘ion channels’ that can form when amyloid is in a particular physical state (known to exist like this in the human brain in Alzheimer’s disease) and we have found that these channels can form in real cell membranes, and they have properties that we are sure makes them toxic. This work is in collaboration with a colleague who is a biochemist and knows about protein folding, John Viles.

Public engagement:
I’ve helped out at MS Research days. I give talks to school kids. I’ve helped advise at the Centre of the Cell here in Whitechapel, particularly on ‘Sophie’s sensational holiday’, a narrative to help young kids think about our senses.
Career history:
BSc (hons) Leeds University; PhD St Andrews University; PGCAP Queen Mary University of London. First became interested in axonal function and demyelination in 1984. I worked with Hugh Bostock at ION, Queen Square, for a number of years. Gained an interest in drugs and pharmacology at Pfizer UK, and then at Yale University Pharmacology Department, working with Murdoch Ritchie. I worked at UCL with John Wood on the molecular biology of sodium channels, before becoming a university lecturer.
I’m part of the Barts-MS team because:
I have been interested in axons since the early 1980’s and I would love to be able to do something to help make the lives of MSers better
When I’m not working:
I’m cycling or walking – probably to a country pub for a glass of cider. Bird watching and gardening (neither very seriously). However I am gradually getting more serious about wine ( I seem to be definitely going through a Pinotage phase at the moment) and I really enjoy cooking food that people like to eat. I like to think I’m gradually getting better at that!

Dr Ruth

Job title:
Clinical Senior Lecturer and Consultant Neurologist
Current research interests:
Early identification and epidemiology of multiple sclerosis, with a particular emphasis on environmental risk factors and MS prevention. Pharmacovigilance, treatment-associated risk and treatment issues around pregnancy in people with MS are a second area of major interest.

Alongside my direct research interests I am particularly interested in gender equality in science, and MS research in particular. I am currently involved in setting up an international mentorship scheme for females working in the MS sphere, in collaboration with colleagues from Australia and the USA.

Public engagement:
I am working with teachers local to me, to help with widening access to university for children in south London. I have also lead a workshop for parents, “What to believe: how to evaluate sources of information”.

I have attended many research days, both speaking on stage and engaging in table and one-to-one discussions. I helped in the development of a Digesting Science activity and have volunteered at a Digesting Science event. I contribute to the blog and to the Digesting Science monthly newsletter.

Career history:
BSc (hons) I studied medicine at Clare College Cambridge and UCL, before completing medical and neurology training in London, Sussex and Birmingham. I completed my PhD in 2013, which examined genetic and environmental determinants of MS risk. This was supported by an ABN/MS Society Clinical Research Training Fellowship and a Brain Entry Scholarship. I have also been awarded an AAN International Scholarship Award for my research.

I initially took up a Consultant Neurologist post at St Georges Hospital, before being tempted back to Barts-MS to continue my research.

I’m part of the Barts-MS team because:
The opportunity to perform research into MS prevention became a reality! Having done my PhD here, I left to continue my clinical training. When the chance arose to return and study something really unique, there was no way I could not return.
When I’m not working:
I’m usually found grappling my two daughters (aged 1 and 4). I also enjoy outdoor swimming and playing the cello in the spare time I have.

Saúl Reyes

Job title:
Clinical Training Fellow
Current research interests:
Multiple Sclerosis, Neuroimmunology, Social capital and Global health.
Public engagement:
Speaker for the annual MS patient education symposium at the Hospital Universitario Fundación Santa Fe de Bogotá in Bogotá, Colombia for the last 5 years.
I’m part of the Barts-MS team because:
I have been selected as an ECTRIMS clinical training fellow to Prof G. I am a young Colombian neurologist and my clinical and research work focuses on MS. In 2013, I worked as a research fellow in MS and related disorders at the Hospital Universitario Fundación Santa Fe de Bogotá in Bogotá, Colombia. I received my training in general Neurology at the Universidad El Bosque under the mentorship of Dr. Jaime Toro (who has been my role model ever since I met Neurology). I have the honour to work with the MS and related disorders research group led by Dr. Toro. The team has an enormous amount of goodwill that has been materialized in valuable research on the epidemiology, genetic predisposition and environmental risk factors for MS in our population. The diagnosis and treatment of MS in Colombia remain an important challenge. My goal is to become an MS specialist and bring some knowledge and expertise to my country to support the development of MS specialized clinics. The ECTRIMS fellowship will be the most educational and important experience of my training as an MSologist.
When I’m not working:
I’m backpacking around the world! Travelling offers a hard-to-replicate opportunity to disconnect from everyday life and reconnect with yourself and the real world. I only need two things for any trip: Laura (my partner in crime for more than 10 years!) and my not very fancy camera. Hopefully, the road of life will give us just enough ways to travel farther and farther away.

Neuro Doc Gnanapavan

Job title:
Consultant Neurologist, Honorary Senior Lecturer
Current research interests:
Biomarkers
Public engagement:
Talks to general public on MS
Career history:
Qualified from Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, PhD from UCL Institute of Neurology and now working at Barts Health and Princess Alexandra Hospital and Queen Mary University of London

I’m part of the Barts-MS team becauseI always was!

When I’m not working:
I’m far far away.

Beki Aldam

Job title:
Public engagement coordinator
Public engagement:
Helping to run Digesting Science, working on the blog and helping to organise research days.
Career history:
BA in English and History, MA in Cultural History; PGCE in English. I’ve done various things, including web editing; teaching English in Germany; work for charities; social media and communication training; tours of the Queen’s House in Greenwich; serving chips in Burger King; teaching English (literature, language and film) in secondary schools. Not necessarily in that order.

I’m part of the Barts-MS team because:
They’re all brilliant and I’m proud to be a part of their work.
When I’m not working:
I’m learning Kate Bush dance routines.

Barts-MS team

Models of Multiple Sclerosis 

  1. Professor David Baker – david.baker@qmul.ac.uk
  2. Professor Sandra Amor – s.amor@vumc.nl
  3. Professor Gianvito Martino – martino.gianvito@hsr.it
  4. Dr. Mark Baker – m.d.baker@qmul.ac.uk
  5. Dr. Gareth Pryce – g.pryce@qmul.ac.uk

EBV and Predict Multiple Sclerosis

  1. Dr. Ute Meier – u.meier@qmul.ac.uk
  2. Professor Julian Gold – j.gold@qmul.ac.uk
  3. Dr. Monica Marta – m.calado-marta@qmul.ac.uk
  4. Dr. David Holden – d.w.holden@qmul.ac.uk
  5. Dr. Angharad Davis – a.davis@qmul.ac.uk

MS Pathology 

  1. Dr. Klaus Schmierer – k.schmierer@qmul.ac.uk
  2. Professor Francesco Scaravilli – f.scaravilli@ucl.ac.uk
  3. Dr. Daniele Carassiti – d.carassiti@qmul.ac.uk
  4. Natalia Petrova – n.petrova@qmul.ac.uk

MRI

  1. Dr. Klaus Schmierer – k.schmierer@qmul.ac.uk
  2. Dr. Marc Miquel – m.e.miquel@qmul.ac.uk
  3. Dr. Tom Campion – thomas.campion@bartshealth.nhs.uk
  4. Dr. Paul Smith

Diagnostic Assays 

  1. Dr. Lucia Bianchi – l.bianchi@qmul.ac.uk
  2. Dr. Sharmilee Gnanapavan – s.gnanapavan@qmul.ac.uk

Outcome measures and public engagement in science

  1. Ms. Alison Thomson – a.thomson@qmul.ac.uk
  2. Dr. Christo Albor – c.albor@qmul.ac.uk

MS Clinical Trials 

  1. Dr Klaus Schmierer – k.schmierer@qmul.ac.uk
  2. Dr Ben Turner – Benjamin.Turner@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk
  3. Dr Giles Elrington – elrington@aol.com
  4. Dr Alastair Noyce – alastair.noyce@mac.com
  5. Ms Maria Espasandin – maria.espasandin@bartshealth.nhs.uk
  6. Ms Chipo Chitsenga – chipo.chitsenga@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk
  7. Ms Anna Bellin – anna.bellin@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk
  8. Ms Ausra Zdanaviciene – ausra.zdanaviciene@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk
On Tour
  1. Dr. Amy McDowell
  2. Dr. Fabiola Puentes
  3. Dr. Katie Lidster
  4. Dr. Eseberuo Sefia
  5. Dr. Ryan Graves
  6. Ms. Alicia Rosello
  7. Ms. Sarah Gout
  8. Dr. Sarah Al-Izki
  9. Dr. Joel Raffel
  10. Dr. Cosimo Maggiore
  11. Dr. Morag Brothwell
  12. Ms. Amy Berg
  13. Ms. Katerina Anselmiova
  14. Dr. Sofia Sisay
  15. Dr. Priya Dua
  16. Dr. Paul Creeke

Translate

Categories

Recent Posts

Recent Comments

Archives