CategoryCOVID-19

Ocvrelizumab can blunt the anti-COVID19 antibody response.

We have recently reported on the the possibility that taking ocrelizumab may reduce your chance of producing protective antibody against COVID-19-related virus. COVID-19 vaccine-readiness for anti-CD20-depleting therapy in autoimmune diseases.Baker D, Roberts CAK, Pryce G, Kang AS, Marta M, Reyes S, Schmierer K, Giovannoni G, Amor S.Clin Exp Immunol. 2020 Jul 16. doi: 10.1111/cei.13495. Online...

Innate immune response and COVID-19

Having reported on the T and B cells. SARS-CoV-2 and Multiple Sclerosis: Not All Immune Depleting DMTs are Equal or Bad.Amor S, Baker D, Khoury SJ, Schmierer K, Giovanonni G.Ann Neurol. 2020 Jun;87(6):794-797 This time DrLove shows off her immunological knowledge to give some insight into how the innate (macrophages and neutrophils) etc. are involved in COVID-19. Get a cup of Tea, and Relax and...

Ocrelizumab inhibts vaccine responses

Ocrelizumab blunts the vaccination response this is shown in a trial if you want to read about it straight from the Horses mouth you can read below but it is behind a pay wall, if you want to see what was shown you can see it for free here. Baker D, Roberts CA, Pryce G, et al. COVID-19 vaccine-readiness for anti-CD20-depleting therapy in autoimmune diseases [published online ahead of print, 2020...

#MSCOVID19 Goes Dutch

Here is the Dutch experience. Here, we provide an extensive overview of all reported COVID-19 cases in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients in the Netherlands between 27 February and 9 June 2020, gathered by the Dutch MS Taskforce of the Netherlands Society of Neurology. A total of 86 MS patients were reported, 43 of whom tested positive for COVID-19. Of 43 patients who tested positive, 22 patients...

#MSCOVID19: the storm

I have been asked many times about how COVID-19 is affecting our MS research programme. The short answer is massively and its true impact is yet to be realised because we are a far way off from anything that feels and looks like normal. We are still paralysed by the threat of a second wave of COVID-19; the social distancing requirements within the NHS means everything is going to be at half-mast...

#MSCOVID19. CD20-antibodies will take time to be optimally vaccine ready.

COVID‐19 vaccine‐readiness for anti‐CD20‐depleting therapy in autoimmune diseases David Baker, Charles AK Roberts, Gareth Pryce, Angray S KangMonica Marta, Saul Reyes,Klaus Schmierer, Gavin GiovannoniSandra Amor. Clin Exp Immunol Although most autoimmune diseases are considered to be CD4 T‐cell or antibody‐mediated, many respond to CD20‐depleting antibodies that have limited influence on CD4 and...

#MSCOVID19: vaccine readiness

Will Prof G have to eat his proverbial hat? I have been telling people that an effective SARS-CoV-2 vaccine is a long way away and that we shouldn’t expect a commercially available vaccine for another 12-18 months. Maybe I am wrong. The Moderna phase 1 results were published by the NEJM yesterday and are more impressive than I expected. These results are so important because the vaccine is...

#MSCOVID19 transient antibody responses

The MS community is panicking because a handful of pwMS on anti-CD20 therapy don’t seem to make antibody responses to SARS-CoV-2. The implications are that these patients are susceptible to reinfection. We can’t be sure of this as lasting long-term antiviral immunity may rely more on T-cell responses, in particular CD8+-T-cell responses, than antibody responses. Let’s hope this is the case. ...

Fingolimod and #MSCOVID19

Clinical exacerbation of SARS-CoV2 infection after fingolimod withdrawal.Gomez-Mayordomo V, Montero-Escribano P, Matías-Guiu JA, González-García N, Porta-Etessam J, Matías-Guiu J.J Med Virol. 2020 Jul 9. doi: 10.1002/jmv.26279. Online ahead of print. The role of disease-modifying therapies in patients with autoimmune disorders during SARS-CoV2 infection is controversial. Immunocompromised...

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