CategoryLifestyle and self-management

Walk beside me…just be my friend

“Don’t walk in front of me… I may not followDon’t walk behind me… I may not leadWalk beside me… just be my friend”― Albert Camus Since lock-down or ‘knock-down’ as I like to call it, I’ve succumbed to the reading club. I have just completed the reading of ‘Motion of the body through space’ by Lionel Shriver, which in my haloed opinion is the most depressive book that...

How to reduce the time to Siponimod

How to reduce the delay of diagnosing secondary progression in multiple sclerosis. Hernan Inojosa, Tjalf Ziemssen July 22, 2020 Letterhttps://doi.org/10.1177/1352458520943799 Do you have secondary progressive MS?. This article points you to a tool devleoped by Novartis who are the makers of Siponimod . This has been licenced for secondary progressive MS so you need to know when this begins It is...

The Kingdom of the Sick

By Rachel Horne For all of us with multiple sclerosis, our story is the same.  One day we got sick and we never got better. Instead we were plunged into the strange hinterland of chronic illness – located between a headache and terminal cancer – where our disease won’t kill us, but it will never go away; where we will undergo treatments, but never a cure – and where we...

Blood flow restricted exercise anyone?

I’m not what you’d call an exercise buff. Running in particular, was relegated to the back of the closet in my late 20s, primarily to save my joints from being sawed to pieces like a bookshelf in my 60s. And whilst, endurance training in the form of cycling and triathlons is the penultimate in fitness these days, I’ve preferred to watch from the side lines at a distance...

#T4TD: biohacking

Did you know two lifestyle options, i.e. exercise and diet, are probably the most effective add-on neuroprotective therapies for treating MS?  Exercise induces long-lasting changes in the brain, which includes upregulation of growth factors and release of endorphins, that are almost certainly neuroprotective. Similarly, diets (caloric restriction, intermittent fasting and low-carbohydrate...

#T4TD – sickness behaviour

This is a first in a new series of ultrashort blog posts called “Thought-4-the-Day” (#T4TD) to make you think about your MS.  Did you know that MS-related fatigue could be caused by sickness behaviour? Sickness behaviour is a coordinated set of adaptive behavioural changes that occur in response to inflammation and/or infection, which includes fatigue or lethargy, depressed mood &...

Do you smoke cannabis?

The findings from this study may interest some of our readers. Cannabis use in MS is licensed for spasticity management and to a lesser extent proven to be helpful with refractory neuropathic pain. Some also use cannabis to manage the psychological downsides of MS. Given it’s increasingly popularity since legalisation, the authors set out to determine whether discontinuing cannabis worsened...

Do you use supplements?

Your body is a temple; or we’d like to think so, but even the most educated of us are susceptible to adding floors and basements to our temple with various additives and dietary quirks. Logic tells us that beyond fatty acids and vitamin D the rest is just fru fru, kitsch to our Id. It is not uncommon for me to get through an MS clinic without someone inquiring about diet or vitamins. So I...

Sleep glorious sleep

In last week’s BMJ there was a short piece on ‘How to write your own wellbeing prescription’ and the top piece of advice was to improve your sleep. Sleep is the most important performance-enhancing agent we know so you have to find a way to optimise your sleep. We know poor sleep is the elephant in the room. Most studies on sleep in MS show that over 70% of pwMS have a sleep disorder of some kind...

Wiped-out and you?

Do you relate to this list of facts in relation to MS-fatigue? The most common spontaneously reported symptom for pwMS is fatigue.PwMS use the words “tired,” “exhausted,” “wiped out,” and having “little or no energy” to describe their fatigue. More patients rated fatigue as their “most troubling symptom” compared with other MS-related...

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