TagNeurofilament

Neurofilaments have it – the story behind smouldering MS

Recently, smouldering MS or chronically active MS lesions have become an entirely new entity in disease progression. They are characterized by a rim of activated microglia/macrophages in both RRMS and progressive MS and are linked to more aggressive disease. These lesions are visible on a type of MRI called susceptibility-based imaging and individuals with MS can have 0, 1-3, or ≥4 of these...

Neurofilaments: from a two towards a three-layered cake!

We are happy to announce that our new paper on how to use cerebrospinal fluid neurofilament light chain (CSF NfL) in daily clinical practice has appeared online (open access) in the journal of Neurology Neuroimmunology and Neuroinflammation.  In this paper, we have documented how the BartsMS team is already using for more than four years NfL values obtained with a lumbar puncture to advise...

Guestpost: Neurofilaments vs. ‘The straight-line instinct’!

Biography I am new to the blog and Barts-MS. I am Dr. Ide Smets and I am an ECTRIMS clinical fellow working in the Barts-MS team. My country of origin is Belgium which is famous for having six governments, for having a national dish that is claimed by another country (French Fries) and for going wild about cyclocross (bring it on Chris Froome ;-)). In 2018, I obtained my PhD in biomedical...

ECTRIMS 2019: Biomarkers

ECTRIMS, Stockholm Biomarkers session Finally in the ECTRIMS mood! Hundred Unbelievable that an year has passed already since the last one, but before I get maudlin, lets get some focus back in. I’ll be co-chairing a session this Friday with Dr Salzer, from Umea University, Sweden (Rituximab man). You can see all the topics of discussion in the program above, but for those of you who...

AAN 2019 posters #3

All good things unfortunately come to an end, and sadly this is the last in the series of three on AAN 2019 posters. What has captured my attention from this years AAN has been the varied interests of the clinician scientists who have presented their work here. This is a good sign, because without varied interests, science and ultimately progress slowly comes to a standstill. I call it the...

Predicting a relapse

The longer I work in MS the more I realize how unpredictable it is. There are complications in diagnosis, in assessing treatment efficacy, in prognosticating, and in achieving homogeneity in clinical practice. The complications are complicated. But what if you have a test done, albeit quite randomly and it tells you something bad is going to happen in the near future – would you ignore it...

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